Discipleship and Identity (Mark 1)

Discipleship is about identity – identity in Christ.

This is clearly illustrated in Mark. Mark’s Gospel was written for two primary purposes: to tell his readers that Jesus is the promised Messiah-King and to call people to follow him. In other words, Mark is all about discipleship: making disciples through the gospel and building disciples through the story of Jesus.

In Mark 1:16-20, we find Jesus calling disciples to follow him. Walking by the Sea of Galilee, Jesus calls two sets of brothers to be his disciples. Notice how following Jesus is directly related to identity.

Simon and Andrew (Mark 1:16-18)ren_ptg_duccio_peter_andrw

Introduction of the characters: We are first introduced to Simon and Andrew in Mark 1:16. Of
all the things Mark could have told us about these brothers in order to introduce them (their home town; their father’s name; etc.), he introduces them as fishermen. In fact, he makes this abundantly clear: “they were casting into the sea, for they were fishermen.” If the act of casting wasn’t clear enough, Mark says directly “they were fishermen.”

Calling: When Jesus calls them, he gives them a new identity: fishers of men. The calling is to follow Jesus with the result that he would make them fishers of men. Thus, the calling relates directly to the introduction of the characters.

Response: Hearing Jesus’s call, Simon and Andrew respond by “leaving the nets” and following Jesus. The old identity is left behind as they respond to the call to follow Jesus. The response is directly related to their identity.

James and John (Mark 1:19-20)

calling-of-james-and-johnIntroduction of the characters: We are introduced to James and John in Mark 1:19. Of all the things Mark could have told us about James and John, he highlights their father’s name. Of course, they were also fishermen, but they are introduced as the “sons of Zebedee” most fundamentally.

Calling: Mark moves quickly through the calling, only informing us that Jesus called them. The response will further clarify the calling.

Response: In response to the call to follow Jesus, James and John “leaving their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men went away after him.” Notice the repetition of Zebedee’s name and the emphasis on James and John leaving him to follow Jesus. Again, the response to follow Jesus is directly related to their identity.

So What?

What does this teach us about discipleship? Discipleship is primarily about identity. In both of these call stories, the calling to follow Jesus related directly to the fundamental identity of those called to discipleship. Simon and Andrew were fishermen. They were called to leave this vocation and given a new one: fishers of men. James and John were the sons of Zebedee. They were called to leave their father and find their primary identity: not as the sons of Zebedee, but as disciples of Jesus.

Discipleship, then, is not so much about a set of tasks, but about a new identity: follower of Jesus. The new tasks follow from the fundamental change in identity.

Advertisements

Kingdom and Covenant, Part 8

Here’s the final installment of the biblical story…

The King Creates a New People

Jesus told his followers that his leaving earth to return to the Father was for their benefit. While this may seem confusing at first, it comes with a great promise. Jesus told his followers that when he left, the Holy Spirit would come. The presence of the Spirit is the presenfamily of godce of Jesus with his people. After Jesus’ ascension, the Holy Spirit came on Pentecost. This fulfilled the Old Testament promises and assured Jesus’ followers that he was with them and would give them the power to fulfill the mission.

The New Testament calls the church the people of God. It is not that God has forgotten about Israel. Rather, there is a new Israel that includes both Jews and Gentiles who believe in Jesus. The mark of the new covenant people is the Holy Spirit. All who believe in Jesus receive the Holy Spirit to dwell within them. The Holy Spirit unites the people of God to Jesus.

The Spirit puts the law of God into the hearts of God’s people and gives God’s people the ability to obey God. The New Testament, especially Paul’s writings, consistently refer to believers as those who are ‘in Christ.’ Those united to Christ are the new people of God. Thus, salvation in the New Testament is both individual and corporate. It is individual in that each member of the new covenant must repent of their sin and believe in Jesus. Each individual member is united to Christ. However, salvation is also corporate because God calls his people into a new community, a new family.

The King’s People Have a Mission

The New Testament gives further instructions about how to live as God’s people. The people of God are to be marked by holiness and mission. They are to be holy, set apart for God. They are not to live like those outside the covenant who continue in rebellion against God. In Christ, the image of God is being renewed in God’s people and they are to reflect this restoration in the way they live. Part of this holiness is to love one another. Unbelievers are to see the love God’s people share and see that this reflects the love of God for his people.humanity world

In addition to holiness, God’s people are to be marked by mission. Jesus commanded his followers to take the good news to the ends of the earth. They are to proclaim the glorious gospel to all peoples. Just as God commanded Adam to fill the earth with the image of God and commanded Israel to be a kingdom of priests, the church is to spread the good news and thus fill the earth with the glory of the gospel. The church in obedience to the great commission is begins to bring about the completion of God’s original intentions for humanity.

New Creation

Finally, the story of the Bible ends with new creation. Actually, this is not so much an ending as a new beginning, for the new creation is eternal. The New Testament teaches that one day Jesus will return to earth to complete the restoration of all things. This restoration is will be a new heaven and a new earth – a restored, new creation.

The new heaven and new earth resemble the garden of Eden in many ways, yet new creation will be better than the first creation. The new creation will be eternally without sin. In the new creation, the resurrected people of God will dwell with him forever. There will be no possibility of sin and corruption.

king-of-kingsThe return of Jesus will trigger a number of events. First, the people of God will be raised from the dead. While the Bible teaches that we are truly saved when we believe in Jesus, salvation is completed only when Jesus returns and raises our bodies from the dead. These will be new, glorified bodies fit for the new creation.

Second, the return of Jesus will also be a time of judgment. Jesus will judge all the enemies of God, beginning with Satan. When Jesus comes back, he will completely defeat Satan and send him to eternity in hell. All those who refuse to believe in Jesus will also be judged with their master, Satan.

Third, Jesus will complete the new creation, giving his people a new place in which to dwell together forever. This is the best promise of all. Jesus announces that at that time, ‘Now the dwelling of God is with men, and he will live with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God. 4 He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.’

Thus, the restoration will be complete. The new creation will be far greater than anything we can possibly imagine. Everything that God intended and promised will be completed and he will be glorified by his people forever.

Jesus will give us face, create a new family, and give us the incredible blessings of God.